Life between the headstones

One of the ecosystems I find most fascinating and wonderful  is that of urban wildlife. We concrete and build, but there a some small instances where still nature struggles on, adapting where it can and clinging to the pockets of green that remain within our towns and cities.

One wonderful example of those pockets of green amidst our concrete jungle is the cemetery. A place for our dead is a home for nature’s life.

I visited my local cemetery yesterday and was instantly surrounded by bird song. I even had a bee fly up to me which, if I didn’t know any better, I’d say was a greeting!

I had Wrens express their alarm at me and a Blue tit call loudly to any who would hear. Crows sat high, observing the world, whilst Magpies hopped  between bushes and  gravestones. Wood Pigeons franticly flapped into flight and Redwings darting about looking for berry-laden branches. Squirrels foraged frenetically. I watched Blackbirds warming themselves in the winter sunlight and Long-tailed tits flit from tree to tree. A Sparrowhawk circled repeatedly and was then chased off by a bold Black-headed Gull. A Goldcrest combed the branches of a Yew bush for any morsels it could find.

All this activity thriving amongst the tributes for lost loved ones, because life finds away!

Wren

Blue Tit

CrowsMagpie

Wood PigeonRegwings

SquirrelsBlackbird

Longtailed Tit

Sparrowhawk

Goldcrest

HeadstoneLove

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One thought on “Life between the headstones

  1. docrichie says:

    Always one of my favourite places. This may be because they are not usually heavily managed, at least not chemically, although the dastardly strimmer is an ever present threat 😦 to invertebrates, slow-worms etc, not to mention peace & quiet & birdsong.

    But I’ve also long had a desire to write a book about ‘mini-wildernesses’, I mean really mini – down to the level of tops of sea stacks, cracks in old stone walls, limestone potholes – the list goes on and on actually the more you get down to that scale. Overlooked by humans, places where nature just gets on with it.

    Fascinating and beautiful, just look at lichen through a binocular microscope.

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